Piltover Parley Ep. 3 ft. Riot Yuujou

Welcome to Piltover Parley!

This is a series (Sometimes audio and sometimes written) where I interview significant figures in the League community and get their viewpoints, thoughts and ideas about the game!

Riot sometimes seems like a mountain you just can’t climb when it comes to getting in. For that reason, I sat down with Alexander “Riot Yuujou” Quach to talk about scouting talent for Riot, success stories and…super sentai?

Bear in mind: This is a SHORTENED TRANSCRIPT of the full interview which you can find here for full viewing or here for listening. This written portion will merely cover some questions for those who are looking for the specific questions/answers.

Getting into Riot and Working There

David aka “CaptainMarvelous”: Real quick, tell us how you ended up working at Riot because it seems like it’s not a company you don’t jump RIGHT into.

Alexander “Riot Yuujou” Quach: Absolutely true on that end. Riot’s not a company you can just, like, pop in and start right away. I started on the sales floor actually! I was folding clothes at Banana Republic and then I traded up to being a supervisor at a retail store. I was at Wallgreens. From there I went on to retail HR. I was the executive human resources at Target before this and then I just fully integrated. Traded retail for games at Riot.

CM: What’s it kinda like working at Riot? There’s a lot of conflicting stories about how Riot is but let’s hear from you; What has been your experience working at Riot so far?

AQ: For me, working at Riot, I work not on the player-facing side. I work internally on our talent discipline. I face Rioters rather than players. Really for me, it’s been an incredible experience. I absolutely love working at Riot! It definitely has had its ups and its downs; people are very nebulous, they change their opinions, they get confused, they can get frustrated. But ultimately, working at Riot has been the best experience of my entire career.

CM: So what would the day in the life of you look like? Is it something you start at six A.M.?

AQ: No no no no. Definitely not at six A.M.! Riot’s very nontraditional in that kind of way. We’ve kind of abolished the nine-to-five paradigm. We’re gamers and we tend to sleep in. We’re everyday people like you or everybody else.

So my day typically starts at ten or eleven because I can’t wake up that early. I’ll get in, probably grab some breakfast, and then trudge through my e-mails to see if I missed anything and then I get into meetings. So my jobs are people-focused. I’m often face-to-face with individuals being a “thought partner” in their work or giving them advice on how to deal with stuff. Other parts of my job include making presentations or designing learning. We’re very bored of the traditional status-quo of classroom teaching and stuff like that. It’s all about innovating that space and making it world class for Rioters.

Looking for the Unicorn

CM: In essence, you talked a lot about how Riot is looking for that unicorn, that perfect person. What is some stuff that is, for lack of a better word, a red flag for you? That “this person has potential”? Would it be talent? Experience? Something they’ve done or even just an awesome cover letter?

AQ: So there are a few things that make-or-break talent. The first is “player empathy” or just being a gamer yourself. Different rioters have different opinions on how much of a gamer you have to be to work at Riot but we all agree, at the very minimum, you have to have player empathy. Our goal is to make the best game experience and be the most player-experienced company. If you can’t understand the pain of being a player, you probably shouldn’t be working here because it’s not going to drive you to fix the things that are wrong and you can’t develop the best products for players. That’s one huge issue we have in un-gaming-related parts of our company. We’ll find people who are HR experts who have never played a game in their life. It’s like “Ugh you’d be SO GOOD but you never played a game in your life.”

On the flipside, we get tons of applicants who are hardcore gamers but have never worked a day in their life. They’re like “Just please Riot, give me a chance! If I can come face to face with someone I know I can get the job!” but they’re really lacking the experience we need to level up our company and level up our team to make our products better. I’d say those are the two big things that stick up as red flags when it comes to hiring people.

CM: Isn’t trying again something Riot’s big on as well? That person whose not going to submit that first application and say “Well they said no. I guess that’s it.”?

AQ: Absolutely! We’re definitely looking for people who are full of perserverence, who can thrive in adversity or face a challenge head on and aren’t afraid to fail. That’s definitely a strong trait we look for in potential Rioters.

Success and Failure at Riot

CM: You talked a little bit about this in your own story but what would be an example of you helped with or you were a part of that was shocking or incredible?

AQ: Hm, significant or incredible…for me, in my time at Riot, I don’t think I’ve had a significant hand in something crazy for a hire but I will tell a story about something one of my peers has done: At Riot before, we didn’t originally have a centralized recruiting model. We were all kind of piecemeal. Originally when Riot started, we didn’t have ANY recruiters. Just very recently we hired a head of recruiters and he came from. It’s very cool to see him integrate into the company because he’s been working at this very established company. Nike’s been around for such a long time.

So he’s come to Riot because we’re this brand-new playspace for him. He’s really come into his own. He’s never played League of Legends in his life but here he’s played so many games and he’s thinking outside of the box. Ways we can improve our recruiting process and ways we can reach out to more people. Help them know what Riot is so they can come to apply to our company. It’s been super cool to see that transformation and have a hand in that.

CM: As a counterpoint to that, what was kind of a situation where someone you really believed in or someone who looked like they had a lot of potential but there was just something that didn’t click? A rioter who you had to pull aside and tell them “This isn’t working”?

AQ: Yeah, we had a guy on campus. He was a super diehard fan of League and was like “Oh my god I’m gonna work at Riot! This is my dream come true!”. But day in and day out, the only thing he did was play games. He was just so into the gaming aspect of Riot that he let his responsibilities fall to the side. It was unfortunate but, because he wasn’t executing on his responsibilities and we weren’t getting any value out of him being here, we ultimately had to see him go.

He was super cool, super chill, great on the rift but in the end he wasn’t “doing” anything and was just kind of riding along. Enjoying being a part of Riot without really providing anything in exchange. That was unfortunately a time where we had to see someone go.

Closing Thoughts and…Super Sentai?

CM: So I have a major question for you: What’s your favorite sentai series?

AQ: My favorite sentai series has to be Samurai Sentai Shinkenger. The theme song was epic, I loved the plot and how gritty it was and the plot twitst took me by surprise.

CM: I just thought it was kind of overrated.

AQ: You do!?

CM: It’s good, it’s just not the best.

AQ: It was my first so I have a strong attachment to it but I’ll take that into consideration right.

CM: Is there anything else you’d like to say for people listening or people interested in Riot?

AQ: I got a couple parting words! My first is for anyone who aspires to be a Rioter. If you’re looking to make it into games and you don’t think it’s possible? I am living, breathing, speaking proof that you don’t have to have ever worked in video games to work in video games. Just believe in what you do, believe in your dreams and passions and it will take you to the right place.

My second kind of parting words is to go check out Super Sentai. It is like power rangers but it is a thousand times better!

 

 

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My Time with Hacktag

Original Article on Fortiscore. Check it out here!

It often feels like co-op games are a dying breed. More and more often, we’re given games with PvP or extremely competitive situations where even cooperation is made in favor of smashing someone else’s team into the dirt. You can imagine my excitement when I was invited to test out Piece of Cake’s new game, Hacktag, at GDC.

Before I played, I briefly sat down with the CEO and Co-CEO of Hacktag to learn about their game. To them, there wasn’t really a game you could play with two people, especially a couples game. They wanted a challenging but co-op game for the both of them to enjoy (and even yell at each other about. Something I found both pretty funny and oddly adorable).

Thus was born Hacktag: A co-op game where two hackers are in charge in infiltrating organizations based on real-life corporations such as news stations and pharma companies. At a glance, everything is pretty stylized; Every agent and person in Hacktag is an anthropomorphic being based on some real-life creature. Wily cats, clever foxes and more are all represented here. You’ll be able to customize your character with a variety of clothes and races too. With the alpha, I slipped into the shoes of a cat-person with some pretty nifty clothing. Our target? Some valuable data in the corporation.

agent-phone
Agent View…

Missions are divided into three types: A mass data-collection where you and your partner have to run around gathering a set amount of info, a mission type where you have to get to one major piece of info from a heavily guarded area, and finally a mission where you have to sabotage and hack your way through a series of tough challenges. You can customize special skills as well, though these are small benefits and won’t greatly impede new players versus old players. For the demo, we played a data-collection type twice…for a major reason.

hackert-camera
…and the Hacker view!

Hacktag is, interestingly enough, an asymmetrical co-op game. One player is the agent running through the real-world area of the corporation, ducking behind desks and quickly tapping computer screens. The other takes control of an agent hidden miles away behind a computer desk, hacking through the lines. It’s a fascinating change of pace and quite enjoyable, as the two play similarly enough to not get new players lost but enough to keep things fresh between the two modes.

Bérenger Dupré (The Co-CEO) and I played through the mission, with him tapping phones to distract guards while I’d run past and disable firewalls for him. Another major feature is that there is a slight element of competition in who can gather more data. It’s not enough to make you forsake your partner (as that’s a game-over for both of you) but it’s enough to make you pause and swipe some data before getting their door open.

The game uses hacking in a variety of minigames, where both players have to match lines, complete button sequences and rapidly tap. I was told there would be more to come in this department, so I can’t imagine these getting old anytime soon. Playing through both sides, I found myself greatly enjoying the world and gameplay as I helped my partner escape out of locked rooms, distracted guards and more while he disabled firewalls and bugged out security programs.

Of course, longevity is a questionable thing and boy does Piece of Cake have you covered. Hacktag will have online and couch co-op, along with a five-hour story campaign for each of the three corporations. In addition, there will be weekly challenges to beat the studio as well as a seed/procedural-generation system where you can share levels with your friends and foes.

agent-caught
This only happened once or twice. Promise.

Perhaps the highest praise I can give this game is that, during my playtest, Bérenger took a moment to gather some data while I was being chased by an angry security system that caught me trying to sneak past it. “Ugh you JERK!” is what I said, but despite this, I still wanted to help. This wasn’t a co-op game where a partner acting selfish hurts you both and provokes spite. No, it made me think of smarmy, sarcastic hackers exchanging quips and one-liners while they had a love-hate relationship from movies and television shows. Piece of Cake Studios has done something amazing with this game and I really cannot wait to play it again with a friend of mine in the near future.

Hacktag is currently on Steam Greenlight, with PS4 and Xbox One support in the future. I highly recommend you give it a go, as co-op games of this caliber should be supported and loved. Even if you exchange some harsh words with your friend who skulked with data while you nervously paced in a prison cell.

All pictures credit to Piece of Cake Studios.